New IAEA Chief Satisfied with Inspections Team Job

new chief of International Atomic Energy Agency, Rafael Grossi, said in an interview with Reuters that “to put deadlines for Iran might not be the best idea”
Grossi, a 58-year-old career diplomat from Argentina who worked as a senior IAEA official from 2010 to 2013, said he “already knows some of the main decision-makers in Iran.”
new chief of International Atomic Energy Agency, Rafael Grossi, said in an interview with Reuters that “to put deadlines for Iran might not be the best idea”

By Navid Felker

In his first day as new chief of International Atomic Energy Agency, Rafael Grossi, said in an interview with Reuters that “to put deadlines for Iran might not be the best idea” when asked how long he was willing to give Iran to provide an explanation that holds water on the particles of uranium that was processed but not enriched.

Tehran has so far failed to provide a satisfactory explanation for the uranium traces found by IAEA inspectors in a “secret atomic warehouse”.
Grossi, a 58-year-old career diplomat from Argentina who worked as a senior IAEA official from 2010 to 2013, said he “already knows some of the main decision-makers in Iran.”

Grossi’s first challenge as IAEA is Iran.

In this regard it should be noted that Jalil Rahimi Jahan Abadi, member of Judicial and Legal Commission of Majles (Iranian Parliament), referring to a threat by France to implement the trigger mechanism against Iran, said, “It is possible that the question of Iran ‘s exit from JCPOA or revision in NPT membership might be considered in taking the fifth step to decrease commitments under the JCPOA because Iran and its economical situation due to sanctions is not the European priority.”

These remarks show new challenge in the Iran nuclear deal issue.

Last month, reports emerged that the Iranian regime had also expelled an IAEA inspector from its soil. This led to mounting tensions with the International Atomic Energy Agency.

In this regard Mr. Grossi told Reuters that he is “satisfied with the work the IAEA’s inspections team has been doing.”